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Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

Q&A: Avoiding Triggers & Diagnosis Before Flare-up

Q. It seems the list of tripwires that might trigger rosacea flare-ups is endless, and now I am afraid to try anything. What should I do?

A. Numerous items have been identified by various rosacea sufferers as causing rosacea flare-ups in their particular cases. However, because each individual is unique, what causes a flare-up for one sufferer may not for another. Before you start avoiding everything, try keeping track of your daily activities and the corresponding condition of your rosacea to pinpoint and avoid exactly what seems to aggravate your particular case.

Q. Can rosacea be diagnosed before you have a major flare-up?

A. It is sometimes possible to identify "prerosacea" in teenagers and persons in their early 20s. These individuals generally come to the dermatologist for acne treatment and exhibit flushing and blushing episodes that last longer than normal. The prolonged redness usually appears over the cheeks, chin, nose or forehead. These patients also may find topical acne medications irritating. Once identified, these rosacea-prone individuals can be counseled to avoid aggravating substances, foods and environmental factors known to cause repeated flushing reactions that may lead to full-blown rosacea.

If you recognize the symptoms of prerosacea in a younger family member or others, they might be advised to consult a dermatologist. Rosacea has also been reported in children.

Issues

Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.