• a
  • a
  • a
  • Adjust text size

Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

Q&A: Discovering Triggers & Cold Weather

Q. I can't seem to identify any specific rosacea triggers. What is the best way to find what might be bothering my condition?

A. There are a great many lifestyle and environmental factors that may trigger or aggravate rosacea signs and symptoms in various individuals. However, none seems to affect everyone. To identify and then avoid any rosacea triggers you may have, try tracking your condition for several weeks using a patient diary checklist from the National Rosacea Society as your guide.

The diary checklist will ask you to document any exposure to various common rosacea triggers each day -- ranging from weather to emotions, activities and foods -- as well as other potential factors and the condition of your rosacea. The rosacea diary checklist is available free from the Society and is also on its Web site at www.rosacea.org.

Q. Will cold weather affect my rosacea?

A. Cold weather is a rosacea trigger for many individuals. In a survey of 1,066 rosacea patients, 46 percent said cold weather aggravated their condition, and 57 percent said they were affected by wind.

If winter weather bothers your rosacea, take special care to protect your skin this time of year. Cover your head and face and limit your time outdoors.

 

Issues

Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.