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Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

Q&A: Chronic Nasal Blockage & Heredity

Q. Is there a link between chronic nasal blockage and rosacea?

A. Chronic nasal obstruction has many potential causes, and there is no evidence linking this condition to rosacea. Even patients with rhinophyma usually can breathe well through their noses. A typical stuffy nose is commonly associated with inflammation of the mucous membranes from various causes, often allergies or viruses.

Although inflammation may be involved in rosacea, the mucous membranes have not been studied sufficiently to determine the extent of involvement. Also, the occurrence of a stuffy nose does not usually trigger rosacea signs and symptoms, although frequent nose blowing may temporarily aggravate flushing.

Q. My grandfather's skin always looked very red. I started flushing in my 40s and now have outbreaks of pimples. Can rosacea be passed on from one generation to another?

A. Recent survey data suggest heredity may play a part in the development of rosacea. Nearly 52 percent of respondents to a recent National Rosacea Society survey of 600 rosacea sufferers said someone else in their family has or did have rosacea, and of those who said they have a relative with rosacea, most indicated it was someone within the immediate family.

 

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.