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New Research Grants Awarded to Further Knowledge of Rosacea

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has awarded five new research grants to advance scientific knowledge of the potential causes and other key aspects of this chronic and potentially devastating disorder that affects an estimated 14 million Americans.

"We are very pleased that a growing number of high-quality research proposals are now being received," said Dr. Jonathan Wilkin, chairman of the Society's medical advisory board, which reviews each grant application and selects for funding those believed most likely to yield important results.

Possible Rosacea Causes Discussed

Medical experts speaking at a forum called "New Concepts in Rosacea" during the recent annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology discussed the potential vascular origins of rosacea, as well as features that rosacea and adolescent acne (acne vulgaris) -- a separate disorder that sometimes also appears in adults -- may have in common.

Dr. Jonathan Wilkin, chairman of the National Rosacea Society medical advisory board, reaffirmed his belief that rosacea appears to be primarily a vascular disorder, citing the changes that are most typically seen.

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Study Uncovers Clues for Possible Ocular Rosacea Diagnostic Test

In a study funded by a grant from the National Rosacea Society (NRS), researchers may have uncovered clues that may lead to a diagnostic marker for subtype 4 (ocular) rosacea, a chronic condition that may have severe consequences if left untreated -- including reduced vision. In publishing the final study results in the medical Journal of Proteome Research,1 the researchers noted that ocular rosacea often may be difficult to diagnose, especially in the absence of signs of rosacea on the skin.

New Study Finds Receptors' Role

New research funded by the National Rosacea Society has found that certain molecular receptors and their activators may play a significant role in producing the redness, visible blood vessels and inflammation of rosacea.

A receptor is a structure in human cells that binds with particular activating substances in the body to trigger certain reactions or responses. Dysfunction of receptors often leads to disease. Accordingly, identification of the mechanisms of these processes, which may then be adjusted, often leads to important therapeutic advances.

NRS Awards New Research Grants to Study Life-Disruptive Disorder

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has awarded funding for six new studies as part of its research grants program to advance scientific knowledge of potential causes and other key aspects of this chronic and often life-disruptive disorder that affects an estimated 14 million Americans.

Scientists Report New Findings at Rosacea Research Workshop

Medical scientists from around the world heard updated reports on advances in the understanding of the potential causes and other key aspects of rosacea at the National Rosacea Society (NRS) research workshop held in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Society for Investigative Dermatology in St. Louis. The NRS conducts the annual workshop to promote interest in rosacea research and to share new information from ongoing studies.

Tears May Mark Ocular Rosacea

Preliminary data from a study funded by the National Rosacea Society have found that the tears of rosacea patients contain different proteins than the tears of people without rosacea. The results point to the potential for a screening test for ocular rosacea in the future.

The study, "Tear Proteins in Patients with Rosacea," is being conducted by a team led by Dr. Mark J. Mannis, chairman of the Department of Ophthalmology at the University of California - Davis.

ATP May Play Key Role in Rosacea

Results from previous research funded by the National Rosacea Society have led investigators Dr. Richard Granstein and colleagues at the Cornell University Medical School to focus in their current study on adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a natural substance in the body that may play a key role in the flushing, telangiectasia and bumps and pimples of rosacea.

H. pylori Linked to Inflammation

According to a pilot study published in the medical journal Acta Dermato-Venereologica by Dr. Camilo Diaz and colleagues in England, there may be a relationship between the bumps (papules) and pimples (pustules) of subtype 2 rosacea and infection with Helicobacter pylori bacteria.1

Research Grants Awarded to Study Causes of Little-Known Disorder

The National Rosacea Society announced that five new studies have been awarded funding as part of its research grants program to advance scientific knowledge of this widespread but poorly understood disorder that affects an estimated 14 million Americans.

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Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.