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Winter 2010

Reaction to Mites May Mimic Rosacea Signs

Some patients who have red scaly faces may in reality have an increased reaction to the Demodex mite rather than rosacea, according to Dr. Joseph Bikowski, clinical assistant professor of dermatology, Ohio State University.

Dr. Bikowski noted that he has treated more than 100 patients with this condition, which involved reaction to these microscopic mites that are normal inhabitants of human skin. In these cases, he reported that patients treated with a topical medication for Demodex cleared within two to four weeks and remained clear for one to two years.

Q&A: Chronic Nasal Blockage & Heredity

Q. Is there a link between chronic nasal blockage and rosacea?

A. Chronic nasal obstruction has many potential causes, and there is no evidence linking this condition to rosacea. Even patients with rhinophyma usually can breathe well through their noses. A typical stuffy nose is commonly associated with inflammation of the mucous membranes from various causes, often allergies or viruses.

Heat Plays Role Even in Cold Winter Season

Heat often brings on the signs and symptoms of rosacea, and this can be a problem even in the frosty winter months, according to a recent National Rosacea Society survey of 424 rosacea patients.

Excess Tissue Can Be Successfully Treated with a Variety of Options

Although subtype 3 (phymatous) rosacea often involves excess tissue, it can be effectively treated with a range of options appropriate for the severity of the case, according to the standard management options for rosacea recently published by the National Rosacea Society.1

New Study Identifies Cause of Flushing

Researchers have now identified the molecular pathway for flushing caused by niacin -- also known as vitamin B3 or nicotinic acid, and found in many foods -- according to a study recently completed by Dr. Robert Walters and colleagues at Duke University and funded by the National Rosacea Society. The new findings may lead to future improvements in the treatment or prevention of rosacea, which is commonly associated with flushing.

She Thought Her Rosacea Was Just an Allergy

Teresa Davisson, like many rosacea patients, never even considered the possibility that she might have rosacea when she experienced her first flare-up as she approached her fortieth birthday.

"I thought it was just an allergic reaction to the lotion I was using, so I switched to another lotion, and my skin cleared up," said the 51-year-old medical biller from Indiana. "Unfortunately, six months later the pimples were back, and I had a blush that wouldn't fade."

Rosacea Now Estimated to Affect at Least 16 Million Americans

Starting with the new decade, it is now estimated by the National Rosacea Society (NRS) that 16 million Americans suffer from the signs and symptoms of rosacea, and millions more may be in temporary remission.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
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National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.