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Fall 2009

Society Publishes New Standards for Optimal Patient Care

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has published new standard patient care options for rosacea, developed by a consensus committee and review panel of 26 rosacea experts, and articles on the various options for controlling the many potential aspects of this widespread disorder will appear in the coming issues of Rosacea Review.1

Rosacea Patients May Be Prone to Allergies

Individuals with rosacea may have a greater propensity for allergic reactions, according to a poster presented at the recent meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology.1 Dermatologist Dr. Cheryl Ackerman, in private practice in Glen Ridge, N.J., noted that many of her rosacea patients were found to have allergic reactions to ingredients found in products used on their skin, and these were identified with patch testing.

She noted that in patients with rosacea, symptoms improved after the identified substance was avoided.

 

Right Combination of Therapy Keeps Rosacea at Bay

J. Peter Brinker Uys is eager to talk of his success managing his rosacea, but he quickly acknowledges his doctor's role in the story. The 56-year-old investment portfolio manager from Atlanta credits his dermatologist with helping him to find the right combination of products to keep his condition under control.

"I have seen dermatologists since I was 13 and had a severe case of acne," he explained. "When I was about 40, I was diagnosed with rosacea, and over time the acne became less prominent and the rosacea more prominent."

Tips for Managing Stressful Times

Patient surveys have shown that emotional stress is one of the leading triggers of rosacea's signs and symptoms. Especially as we head into the busy holiday season, here are some tips that may help you to cope.

 

  • Learn to say no. Taking on more than you can handle is a sure-fire recipe for stress. Pare down your to-do list by dropping tasks that aren't true necessities.

 

Q&A: Winter Rosacea & Ocular Rosacea and Contacts

Q. Although I have rosacea, the symptoms only appear in the winter, not during the summer. Is it possible to have "winter rosacea"?

A. While many rosacea patients are affected by environmental factors that change with the seasons, what affects one person may not affect another. It may be that you are particularly sensitive to wind or frigid weather and these winter elements aggravate your rosacea.

Patients More Likely to Take Oral Antibiotics If Side Effects Reduced

If potential complications and side effects of oral antibiotic therapy were minimized, the vast majority of rosacea sufferers would be more likely to accept oral therapy to treat their condition, according to results of a recent National Rosacea Society survey of 520 rosacea patients.

Studies Lead Toward Potential Therapies

Results of research funded by donations from members of the National Rosacea Society (NRS) are not only increasing medical understanding of the disorder, but are now revealing potential causes that may lead scientists toward important new advances in therapy.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.