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Fall 2007

Cosmetics Help Appearance in Some But Aggravate Rosacea in Others

The effects of cosmetics on rosacea can vary widely from helping appearance to aggravating the condition, according to a new survey by the National Rosacea Society.

Among 921 rosacea patients responding to the survey on cosmetics, 30 percent reported that liquid facial foundation helped their appearance, followed by 19 percent who said pressed powder and 17 percent who said cream foundation helped. Another 17 percent reported powder blush helped, while 14 percent said loose powder and 13 percent reported mineral makeup powder improved appearance.

Q&A: Tanning Beds & Caffeine

Q. Are tanning beds better or worse than the sun for rosacea patients?

A. In a National Rosacea Society (NRS) patient survey, sun exposure ranked as one of the most common rosacea triggers. At the same time, the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) has conducted a public awareness campaign to warn against the dangers of indoor tanning.

Tips for Coping with the Holidays

The changing weather, combined with a social calendar packed with get-togethers and parties, can wreak havoc on rosacea. Here are some tips for navigating the upcoming holiday season successfully:

  • Take care of yourself. A hectic schedule can lead to stress-induced flare-ups. Get plenty of rest, eat right, maintain a daily exercise routine and don't over-commit yourself.

Special Care, New Technology Aid Ocular Rosacea

Special care may be needed for rosacea patients with severe forms of ocular rosacea, according to Dr. Sandra Cremers, instructor of ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School. As part of a National Rosacea Society (NRS) research grant, she recently developed a scoring system to identify severe cases of this rosacea subtype, which may affect half of all rosacea patients.

She Finds the Finishing Touch for Her Rosacea

Nat Dean, a 51-year-old artist, designer and writer from Santa Fe who was diagnosed with rosacea in her late 40s, was among the many rosacea sufferers who feel self-conscious about their appearance during outbreaks -- but not anymore.

Nat said her dermatologist diagnosed her condition when she began to develop a few small pustules on her cheeks, and he prescribed a topical medication that she continues to use to this day. She also applies a special face wash and a rotation of lotions to combat the dry New Mexico climate, in addition to avoiding her rosacea triggers.

Breakthrough Study Wins Wide Coverage

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) funded research study on the role of cathelicidins in rosacea (see associated article) was recently published by Yamasaki et al. in Nature Medicine, one of the most prestigious medical scientific journals.1 It not only alerted the medical community to these new findings, but raised public awareness of rosacea through media coverage nationwide.

NRS-Funded Studies Shine Light on Potential New Treatment Advances

Medical scientists reported key results of ongoing research on potential causes of rosacea during the eighth annual rosacea research workshop, sponsored by the National Rosacea Society (NRS). The workshop was conducted during the annual meeting of the Society for Investigative Dermatology, and was attended by more than 100 medical researchers from around the world.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.