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Spring 1996

Skin-care Tips for Reducing Symptoms

Topical antibiotics are widely prescribed to reduce redness, bumps and pimples as well as to help maintain remission of rosacea. Here is a way recommended by medical experts to use your medication in combination with other skin care products.

  1. Cleanse your face each morning, being careful not to irritate it. Rinse with plenty of water, and use a cotton towel with a thick pile to blot your face dry. Then wait for it to air dry.

Your Skin May Influence Rosacea's Appearance

Your skin is your bodyguard. Tough but pliable, it is a barrier to harmful substances, protects against excess ultraviolet radiation and helps regulate body temperature.

But in rosacea sufferers, the facial portion of this largest and most visible organ may erupt on its own or respond to a variety of environmental and lifestyle factors with redness, a pimple-strewn appearance and even an irritated feeling. Just what is your skin made of, and how does rosacea affect it?

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Q&A: Avoiding Triggers & Diagnosis Before Flare-up

Q. It seems the list of tripwires that might trigger rosacea flare-ups is endless, and now I am afraid to try anything. What should I do?

A. Numerous items have been identified by various rosacea sufferers as causing rosacea flare-ups in their particular cases. However, because each individual is unique, what causes a flare-up for one sufferer may not for another. Before you start avoiding everything, try keeping track of your daily activities and the corresponding condition of your rosacea to pinpoint and avoid exactly what seems to aggravate your particular case.

'Red Nose' Concerned This College Professor

John was a respected professor on a college campus. Then at the age of 57, he started to have trouble with pimples and redness on his face, mostly on his nose. He had periodic outbreaks, followed by soreness and an embarrassing red nose. Though John's facial problems didn't seem to affect his professional relationships, he was still concerned.

"I was worried that people might associate my red nose with drinking," he said.

Survey Reports Sun Season Hardest on Rosacea Symptoms

With spring blossoming and summer approaching, a majority of rosacea sufferers may find they must take special precautions to avoid flare-ups, according to a survey by the National Rosacea Society.

In the survey of more than 700 rosacea sufferers, 71 percent said their condition was affected by changes in seasons. Of all the seasons, summer was found the hardest to endure by most, with 57 percent of the respondents reporting that their symptoms are at their worst during this time of year.

Rosacea Found 'Not Uncommon' in South Korea

While acknowledging that rosacea is more widespread among fair-skinned individuals, researchers found that rosacea is "not uncommon" in Korea, according to information presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Rosacea was diagnosed in about 1 percent of nearly 6,000 patients who visited the clinic of Drs. B. J. Kim, J. M. Park, J. N. Park and W. S. Koh of the Department of Dermatology, Inje University College of Medicine, Sanggye Paik Hospital in Seoul, South Korea.

Rosacea Help Now Available Through Web Site on Internet

Dermatologists report that the incidence of rosacea, which currently affects an estimated 13 million Americans, appears to be rapidly increasing now that the 77 million members of the baby boom generation have entered the most susceptible age. To encourage wider knowledge of this disorder, the National Rosacea Society has joined the "information highway" to add yet another way for rosacea sufferers to obtain information on their condition.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.