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Rosacea Review: Summer 2013

Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

Although the progression of rosacea can vary substantially from one individual to another, flushing and persistent redness are by far the most common early signs of the disorder, according to a new survey conducted by the National Rosacea Society.

A possible genetic link found in twins with rosacea and increased understanding of biochemical processes that may lead to the disorder are among the insights reported by investigators at the midpoints of their new research supported by the National Rosacea Society (NRS).

Residents of New England appear to suffer the highest incidence of rosacea in the United States, while those in Hawaii may be affected the least, according to a geographic analysis of National Rosacea Society (NRS) membership data. 

Many spas, salons and clinics offer cosmetic procedures touted to make your skin look younger and healthier, but rosacea patients with sensitive skin need to be particularly aware of potential side effects.  Here are some tips to keep in mind when considering such treatment:

New research suggests that, for some rosacea sufferers, the condition may be linked to their gut.1

In a small pilot study published as a letter in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, about half of 63 rosacea patients also had small intestinal bacteria overgrowth, or SIBO. After localized treatment for SIBO, 46 percent of these patients reported marked improvement of their rosacea symptoms.

The researchers noted that further study would contribute to an understanding of the potential significance of these findings.

Making the time to perform a warm water eye soak each morning could be difficult for someone who knows she can’t be late to her job as a dental hygienist, but for 59-year-old Carol Christensen from Minnesota, the effort is well worth it.  “Having comfortable eyes is really bliss,” she said.

Carol was diagnosed with rosacea in her early 40s when intense and frequent menopausal hot flashes triggered lingering facial flushing.  She managed her symptoms well for years following a short course of oral therapy and long-term topical therapy.

Issues

Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.