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exercise

Q&A: Exercise & Itchy Eyelids

Q.  I enjoy lifting weights, but whenever I put my body under physical stress my symptoms get worse.  What type of physical exercise is optimal and at what intensity? 

A.  Any physical exercise that greatly increases your core body temperature may result in flushing and a flare-up of rosacea symptoms, so low- to medium-intensity exercise is probably your best bet.  You might be able to reduce the intensity of your current exercise routine with these techniques:

Exercise May Cause Flare-Ups But Can Be Controlled, Survey Shows

While physical exercise may be a common rosacea trigger, the right changes in routines can reduce the likelihood of a flare-up, according to results of a new patient survey by the National Rosacea Society.

More than 80 percent of the survey’s 563 respondents said exercise aggravates their rosacea signs and symptoms.  Aerobic exercise in general (also known as cardio) was cited as the most aggravating, mentioned by nearly 55 percent of the patients.  This type of exercise increases the demand for oxygen, resulting in higher respiration and heart rates.

Tips for Exercising Without Flare-Ups

The increase in body temperature brought about by exercise may lead to a flare-up for many rosacea sufferers. Yet abandoning an exercise routine is not the answer to this dilemma. Here are tips for minimizing exercise-induced flare-ups:

  • Watch the forecast. In warm weather, outdoor exercise should be limited to early morning or evening hours to avoid the midday heat and sun. For activities such as walking or cycling, look for shaded trails instead of hot asphalt. Don't forget to wear sunscreen (SPF 15 or higher).

Exercise Can Affect Rosacea, But Modifying Routine Helps

According to a new survey of 1,261 rosacea patients by the National Rosacea Society, more than 83 percent are affected at least somewhat by exercise. Fortunately, of those who have modified their exercise routine because of this condition, 89 percent said this had reduced their signs and symptoms.

Tips for Outdoor Exercise Routines

Since the arrival of spring naturally draws people outside, here are some tips for enjoying outdoor exercise while minimizing rosacea flare-ups.

  • Consider the potential for a rosacea flare-up. Over-exertion is a common rosacea trigger for many. In a survey of rosacea patients, exercise caused flare-ups in 55 percent of runners, and 46 percent of cyclers and swimmers. In contrast, golf only caused flare-ups for 29 percent of those participating.

     

Q&A: Pimples on Lips & Sweating

Q. I suffer from bumps or pimples that aggravate my lips. Is this caused by my rosacea?

Exercise Often Leaves Sufferers Red In the Face, According to Survey

While a broad range of exercise activities may often aggravate rosacea symptoms, patients are nearly always able to reduce these flare-ups by modifying their exercise routines, according to a survey by the National Rosacea Society.

For most of the 732 respondents, exercise is part of their lifestyle. Forty-two percent reported they exercise frequently and another 34 percent said they exercise daily. But trying to stay healthy doesn't come without a price. For 64 percent of the survey participants, exercise had caused their rosacea to flare up or flare up somewhat.

Tips for Exercise

Exercise is a necessary part of a healthy lifestyle. But for many rosacea sufferers, flushing from exercise may pose a special challenge if it causes their condition to flare up.

In most cases, precautions or moderation will let you get the exercise you need to remain fit, while minimizing your chances of a flare-up. Here are suggestions on how to proceed with your workout:

  • You don't need a high-intensity workout to reap the benefits of exercise. Choose a low-intensity workout -- it's just as beneficial.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.