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Q&A: Scalp Symptoms & Preventive Measures

Q. Not only do I have rosacea on my face, but I also have symptoms on my scalp. Is this common and how should it be treated?

A. While rosacea is primarily a disorder of the facial skin, it may also appear in other areas. In a survey of rosacea patients, signs and symptoms were reported by 15 percent of the respondents on the neck, 6 percent on the chest, 5 percent on the scalp and 4 percent on the ears.

Rosacea among Family Members Suggests Heredity

Some individuals may be genetically predisposed to develop rosacea, according to results of a study to determine whether rosacea patients had a family history of the disorder and whether they came from a particular ancestral community of origin. The results were reported in a poster presentation by Dr. Wayne Guliver, chairman of dermatology, and other researchers at Memorial University of Newfoundland during the annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology. 1

Will Your Children Have Rosacea?

Having children follow in their footsteps can be the ultimate satisfaction for many parents, but not in the case of rosacea. Evidence suggests that heredity may indeed play a role in the development of this disorder, and that the children and other relatives of rosacea sufferers would be wise to be on the lookout for early signs as they grow older in order to seek diagnosis and treatment before the condition reaches more advanced stages.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.