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flare-ups

Q&A: Triggers & Painful Bump

Q.  Certain activities trigger mild, short-lasting rosacea outbreaks on my cheeks and/or nose.  The outbreaks are not severe enough to make me stop these activities, but if I keep doing them could the flare-ups get worse?

A.  This aspect of potential rosacea triggers has not been studied, so it is unclear whether repeated exposure makes subsequent flare-ups worse.  Physicians have observed, however, that the signs and symptoms of rosacea tend to become increasingly severe without medical treatment and proper care.

Exercise May Cause Flare-Ups But Can Be Controlled, Survey Shows

While physical exercise may be a common rosacea trigger, the right changes in routines can reduce the likelihood of a flare-up, according to results of a new patient survey by the National Rosacea Society.

More than 80 percent of the survey’s 563 respondents said exercise aggravates their rosacea signs and symptoms.  Aerobic exercise in general (also known as cardio) was cited as the most aggravating, mentioned by nearly 55 percent of the patients.  This type of exercise increases the demand for oxygen, resulting in higher respiration and heart rates.

Sunscreen, Other Measures Help Reduce Flare-Ups, Survey Shows

Although sun exposure may be the most common rosacea trigger, patients who take steps to protect their skin when outdoors have been successful in reducing rosacea outbreaks, according to a new National Rosacea Society patient survey. Virtually all of the 739 respondents said they make an effort to shield their skin from the sun, and 88 percent of those said their efforts had been successful or somewhat successful in reducing their rosacea flare-ups.

Survey Shows Controlling Stress Can Reduce Flare-Up Frequency

Although emotional stress is reported to be one of the most common rosacea triggers, effective stress management can lead to a reduction in the number of stress-related flare-ups, according to results of a new National Rosacea Society (NRS) survey.

Q&A: Treating Flare-Ups & Computer Use

Q. I keep seeing advice on how to prevent a flare-up, but not how to treat one. When I wake up in the morning and my face is covered in red bumps and pustules, is there any treatment that provides immediate relief?

Q&A: Sun Exposure & Vitamin D

Q. My flare-ups seem to be triggered primarily by sun exposure. Will a good sunscreen be enough to prevent flare-ups or must I always wear a hat when outside?

A. Because sun exposure is a leading flare-up trigger for so many, using sunscreen with an SPF (sun-protection factor) of 15 or higher is recommended for most rosacea patients all year-round -- but it is also important to avoid direct sunlight as much as possible.

Tips for Avoiding Summer Flare-Ups

Summer can be a troublesome time for rosacea sufferers, as avoiding some of the most common rosacea triggers -- the sun, hot weather and humidity -- requires special attention. Follow these tips for a successful summer season.

 

  • Know your triggers. If you have identified the lifestyle and environmental factors that contribute to your flare-ups, you have a better chance of controlling your condition.

 

Essential Steps Help Keep Rosacea at Bay

Though rosacea's signs and symptoms may often be unpredictable and frustrating, three basic practices - adherence to medical therapy, avoiding triggers and gentle skin care - can help bring it under control on a long-term basis.

"Patients must first make a strong commitment to long-term medical therapy," said Dr. Boni Elewski, vice chair of dermatology at the University of Alabama - Birmingham.

Q&A: Permanent Facial Redness & Rosacea in 20s

Q. Does each flare-up increase my chances of permanent facial redness?

Flare-Ups Strike Often, Survey Says

Rosacea has commonly been characterized as a disease of flare-ups and remissions, and data from a recent National Rosacea Society survey of 954 patients confirm that pattern.

More than 55 percent of the respondents said they experience an outbreak or increased intensity of symptoms at least once a month, including 24 percent who noted they have a flare-up every few days, 15 percent who said once a week, and the remainder who said once a month. Another 25 percent said they have a flare-up every few months.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.