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medical therapy

Patient Overcomes Five-Year Break in Medical Therapy

Andrea considered herself somewhat fortunate when she was diagnosed with rosacea about 15 years ago because her doctor worked closely with her to find just the right combination of medications and skin care products for her sensitive skin. The 46-year-old Russian translator from Maryland often stood in front of large crowds when she performed simultaneous interpretations, and she was grateful that she was able to keep her condition under control with oral and topical therapy.

Careful Detective Work Helps Manage Rosacea

In addition to complying with medical therapy, an important part of managing rosacea for many patients is to identify and avoid environmental and lifestyle factors that may trigger or aggravate their individual conditions.

Flushing Controlled With Multiple Options

Although flushing may be the most difficult component of rosacea to treat, it can be controlled with a variety of options that must be tailored to each individual -- including medications for severe cases -- according to physicians now developing standard disease management options as part of a consensus committee organized by the National Rosacea Society (NRS).

Survey Shows Rosacea's Emotional Toll, Positive Effects of Medical Therapy

Rosacea often casts a negative spell on quality of life and emotional well-being that is in direct proportion to its physical effects, according to a new survey by the National Rosacea Society. Fortunately, most rosacea patients reported they are able to overcome these drawbacks through effective medical therapy and coping techniques.

Q&A: Long-Term Medication & Craving Triggers

Q. If I take long-term medication consistently, will it lose its effectiveness?

A. Topical therapy is commonly prescribed to control rosacea on a long-term basis, and no evidence has suggested that it loses effectiveness. A long-term controlled clinical study found that 77 percent of rosacea patients consistently using topical metronidazole remained in remission, while 42 percent of patients using no therapy had relapsed within six months.

Extreme Flushing May Be Reduced with Medication

Most cases of rosacea can be controlled with oral and long-term topical antibiotics, combined with avoiding lifestyle and environmental factors that may aggravate the disorder in individual cases. In certain patients, however, dermatologists may prescribe additional medication to prevent flushing and reduce severe redness that may not be well-controlled by other means.1

Patients Should Not Spot Treat Rosacea

At a symposium during a recent meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology, Dr. Mark V. Dahl, chairman of Dermatology, University of Minnesota, noted that to ensure the effectiveness of topical antibiotic therapy for rosacea, patients must spread the medication over the entire face.

"Some patients may apply topical therapy to individual papules and pustules, much as they may have treated acne when they were younger," said Dr. Dahl. "It is important to use this medication over the entire face as a preventive measure for it to be useful."

Q&A: Drug Resistance & Late Breaking Rosacea

Q. I am using a topical antibiotic to control my rosacea with great success. Should I suspend treatment for a couple of weeks to prevent developing a resistance to the medication?

Long-term Therapy Prevents Relapse of Rosacea Symptoms

When dealing with rosacea, experts agree that a strong offense is usually a patient's best defense. According to research, rosacea sufferers who diligently follow long-term medical therapy substantially reduce their chances of a relapse.

Watch Out for Adverse Reactions with Oral Drugs

To treat rosacea, dermatologists often initially prescribe oral antibiotic tablets to bring the condition under immediate control. However, taking more than one oral medication for different conditions may produce an adverse reaction, according to Dr. H. Irving Katz, professor of dermatology at the University of Minnesota, speaking at a recent meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
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National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.