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nervous system

Neuropeptide May Play Role in Pain and Flushing

According to a study funded by the National Rosacea Society, researchers have found a potential connection between the nervous system and the redness and stinging of subtype 1 (erythematotelangiectatic) rosacea.

Drs. Ferda Cevikbas and Martin Steinhoff, University of California-San Francisco, noted that the flushed face of rosacea is often accompanied by stinging and burning, signs of nerve activation. They theorized this may signal a dysfunction in communication between the nerves and the vascular system.

New NRS-Funded Studies Open Way for Advances in Treatment

Two recent studies, funded by individual donations to the National Rosacea Society (NRS), have discovered potential key factors in the development of rosacea that open new possibilities for important advances in its treatment and prevention.

A malfunction in part of the body's nervous system may be linked to the redness as well as the bumps and pimples of rosacea, according to a recently completed study by Dr. Akihiko Ikoma and colleagues at the University of California-San Francisco.

Nerve Symptoms May Present New Subset

Individuals with prominent neurologic symptoms might be considered a subset of rosacea, according to a report by Dr. Tiffany Scharschmidt and colleagues at the department of dermatology, University of California-San Francisco.1

In their study of 14 rosacea patients, the researchers found that a high percentage had neurologic (43 percent) or neuropsychiatric (50 percent) conditions such as headaches, depression, essential tremor and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

NRS Research Grants Announced by NRS Medical Advisory Board

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has awarded funding for three new studies in addition to continuing support for five ongoing studies as part of its research grants program to increase knowledge and understanding of the potential causes and other key aspects of rosacea.

Rosacea Trigger Aids Medical Research

The same biochemical process that causes people to flush when alarmed or embarrassed may be linked to the development of rosacea, according to findings presented by Dr. Richard Granstein, chairman of dermatology at Cornell University, during the recent Society for Investigative Dermatology annual meeting.

National Rosacea Society Awards New Grants for Rosacea Research

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has awarded funding for four new studies as part of its research grants program to advance scientific knowledge of the potential causes and other key aspects of this chronic and potentially life-disruptive disorder that affects an estimated 14 million Americans.

NRS-Funded Studies Shine Light on Potential New Treatment Advances

Medical scientists reported key results of ongoing research on potential causes of rosacea during the eighth annual rosacea research workshop, sponsored by the National Rosacea Society (NRS). The workshop was conducted during the annual meeting of the Society for Investigative Dermatology, and was attended by more than 100 medical researchers from around the world.

New Research Grants Awarded to Further Knowledge of Rosacea

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has awarded five new research grants to advance scientific knowledge of the potential causes and other key aspects of this chronic and potentially devastating disorder that affects an estimated 14 million Americans.

"We are very pleased that a growing number of high-quality research proposals are now being received," said Dr. Jonathan Wilkin, chairman of the Society's medical advisory board, which reviews each grant application and selects for funding those believed most likely to yield important results.

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Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
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National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.