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pregnancy

Patient Overcomes Five-Year Break in Medical Therapy

Andrea considered herself somewhat fortunate when she was diagnosed with rosacea about 15 years ago because her doctor worked closely with her to find just the right combination of medications and skin care products for her sensitive skin. The 46-year-old Russian translator from Maryland often stood in front of large crowds when she performed simultaneous interpretations, and she was grateful that she was able to keep her condition under control with oral and topical therapy.

Q&A: Eyes in Winter & Pregnancy

Q. Rosacea seems to affect my eyes more in the winter. Is there anything I can do?

A. Wind and cold temperatures may cause irritation and increase the watery discharge associated with ocular rosacea (eye symptoms)1. Besides limiting time outdoors during winter, patients with ocular rosacea can protect their eyes from icy blasts by wearing ultraviolet protective glasses or sunglasses.

Devastating Skin Condition Strikes During Her Pregnancy

At the height of one of the happiest times of her life, awaiting the birth of her first child, Aimee Skaggs was hit with a devastating facial skin condition.

"All through my pregnancy, my complexion became redder and redder, until it was almost purple," Skaggs said. "I tried not to let it get me down. I was excited about my first child and didn't want to feel as though the only thing I cared about was how I looked."

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.