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psychological effects

Survey Shows Controlling Stress Can Reduce Flare-Up Frequency

Although emotional stress is reported to be one of the most common rosacea triggers, effective stress management can lead to a reduction in the number of stress-related flare-ups, according to results of a new National Rosacea Society (NRS) survey.

Nerve Symptoms May Present New Subset

Individuals with prominent neurologic symptoms might be considered a subset of rosacea, according to a report by Dr. Tiffany Scharschmidt and colleagues at the department of dermatology, University of California-San Francisco.1

In their study of 14 rosacea patients, the researchers found that a high percentage had neurologic (43 percent) or neuropsychiatric (50 percent) conditions such as headaches, depression, essential tremor and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Turn the Tables on Awkward Questions

Insensitive questions about facial appearance can be a double whammy for rosacea sufferers — the questions may not only cause embarrassment, but can lead to stress that may make the symptoms even worse. Fortunately, however, rosacea patients can usually bring this potentially destructive cycle to a halt by reacting positively, according to psychologists familiar with dermatological disorders.

Her Commitment to Therapy Keeps Rosacea at Bay

For years, Heidi Nunnally was treated for what her doctor said was acne, but her skin never seemed to get better.

"I felt like a leper. I was embarrassed to go out in public," said the 44-year-old legal secretary. It was only after she was correctly diagnosed with rosacea seven years ago that she finally was able to regain a clear complexion and her self-confidence.

Psychologist Advises Managing Disease Can Break Cycle of Stress

Conspicuous disorders like rosacea can involve so many other areas of life that even a mild case can be severely distressing, said Richard G. Fried, M.D., clinical psychologist and director of Yardley Dermatology Associates, at the recent meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology. But giving patients control over their disease can break the self-destructive cycle and help keep flare-ups at bay.

Rosacea Takes Emotional Toll but Many Learn How to Cope

In addition to its physical effects, rosacea often casts a dreary spell on one's emotional well-being, according to a survey of rosacea patients by the National Rosacea Society. Fortunately, most patients said they are able to overcome these drawbacks through effective treatment and coping techniques.

Sufferer Turns to Poetry to Soothe His Skin Problem

Theodore C. Kent, Ph.D. has his own method for soothing his rosacea. He turns to poetry to help relieve stress and his rosacea symptoms.

"Poetry, because of its rhythms, dives into your psyche," said Dr. Kent, a retired clinical psychologist who now teaches retirees who have gone back to school. "It provides advice and encouragement that make you feel better about yourself."

Tips for Responding to Rude Comments

Some rosacea sufferers have reported that the physical effects of the disease have led to rude comments, stares or even jokes about their appearance. Here are some ways you can take control of these situations and feel good about yourself:

  • Realize that most individuals are unaware of rosacea, so take into account that most reactions are simply caused by curiosity and ignorance of the disease, rather than some negative intent.

Acceptance Is Key to Recovery

Rosacea sufferers may feel dismay when the conspicuous and embarrassing symptoms of a flare-up appear for the first time. But if they resist accepting that they have a medical disorder, sufferers may be turning what could be an easily managed situation into one of considerable psychological distress as their condition worsens.1

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National Rosacea Society
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Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.