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Q&A

Q&A: Sun Exposure and Aggravating Ingredients

Q. Is it common to break out in an itchy, bumpy rash (always on my forehead) after slight sun exposure?  Would sunscreen help prevent this?

A. In patient surveys, the sun ranks as the most common trigger for rosacea flare-ups, so it is likely that the sun is the culprit in your case. Even incidental exposure, such as running errands on a sunny day, might be enough to cause an outbreak of rosacea symptoms in some individuals.

Q & A: Is salicylic acid a known rosacea trigger?

Q. Is salicylic acid a known rosacea trigger? I just purchased a new cleanser and noticed this in the ingredient list.

Q&A: Burning and Itching & Heredity

Q. This is my second round of rosacea, but this time it came with a tightening, burning, hot feeling. It is also very itchy. Is itching normal?

A. Yes, itching is a common secondary symptom of rosacea.

Q&A: Ear Involvement & Intestinal Bacteria

Q. My ears have been weeping and draining for three years. I was diagnosed with ocular and regular rosacea a year ago. Is there such a thing as inner ear rosacea?

A. Rosacea is primarily a disorder of the facial skin, but it may also occur on the skin of other parts of the body such as the neck, chest, scalp or ears. However, there is not good evidence in medical literature linking rosacea to symptoms of the inner ear.

Q&A: Itching Disrupts Sleep & Safe Skin-Care Products

Q. I have itching due to rosacea that occurs during the evening and disrupts my sleep. What can I do to alleviate this itching?

A. Sleeping in a room that is too warm often causes itching. A fan or air conditioner may help alleviate this.

The itching also may be caused by overly dry skin or by skin-care products. Avoid rubbing and scratching, which may bring immediate relief but can make matters worse.

Q&A: Rosacea on Lips & What is Granulomatous Rosacea?

Q. Can rosacea be on the lips as well? If so, what can be done to treat them?

A. There have been no reports in the medical literature of rosacea on the lips, although the bumps and pimples of rosacea may appear around the mouth. This can be treated with standard therapy for rosacea.

Another common disorder called perioral dermatitis may also occur around the mouth, and is associated with small bumps, as well as scaling and peeling. This condition can often be effectively controlled with appropriate treatment.

Q&A: Chronic Nasal Blockage & Heredity

Q. Is there a link between chronic nasal blockage and rosacea?

A. Chronic nasal obstruction has many potential causes, and there is no evidence linking this condition to rosacea. Even patients with rhinophyma usually can breathe well through their noses. A typical stuffy nose is commonly associated with inflammation of the mucous membranes from various causes, often allergies or viruses.

Q&A: In What Order? & Extensive Flushing

Q. I have special sunscreen, topical medication and special makeup. In what order should these three things be applied to my face?

A. From both medical and cosmetic standpoints, it makes much more sense to apply your medication before applying your sunscreen and makeup.

Q&A: Treating Flare-Ups & Computer Use

Q. I keep seeing advice on how to prevent a flare-up, but not how to treat one. When I wake up in the morning and my face is covered in red bumps and pustules, is there any treatment that provides immediate relief?

Q&A: Sun Exposure & Vitamin D

Q. My flare-ups seem to be triggered primarily by sun exposure. Will a good sunscreen be enough to prevent flare-ups or must I always wear a hat when outside?

A. Because sun exposure is a leading flare-up trigger for so many, using sunscreen with an SPF (sun-protection factor) of 15 or higher is recommended for most rosacea patients all year-round -- but it is also important to avoid direct sunlight as much as possible.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.