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Q&A

Q&A: Coffee or Tea @ Localized Flare-ups

Q. Does caffeine in coffee or tea cause rosacea flare-ups?

Q&A: Blood Pressure Medication & How Long Does Rosacea Last?

Q. Is it possible that the medication I am taking for high blood pressure could be aggravating my rosacea?

A. It has been reported that some medications, for example high blood pressure medicines, may precipitate a sudden onset of flushing, which can aggravate rosacea. Be sure to let your dermatologist know of any medications you may be taking for other disorders.

Q. I just learned I have rosacea. How long does this disease last?

Q&A: Seasonal Rosacea & Severity with Aging

Q. My rosacea seems to get worse in the fall and spring. Why would this be so?

Q&A: Controlling Blushing & Sunscreen and Medication

Q. Is there any way to control blushing? I feel handicapped when I am in a small group because I feel my whole face is glowing red.

A. Blushing is a common phenomenon, especially in people whose fair skin cannot hide the sudden onset of facial redness. It is often caused by emotions, but can also be triggered by a variety of environmental and other factors.

Q&A: Missing Symptoms & Housebleaning Flare-up

Q. I was diagnosed with rosacea several years ago, but I've never had any visible blood vessels, bumps or pimples. I have eye irritation, and have only experienced some redness on my face. Is it possible for rosacea not to include its most common signs?

A. The signs and symptoms of rosacea can vary substantially from one patient to another, and may include various combinations of signs and symptoms.

Q&A: Moisturizer and Medication & Allergies

Q. My face is dry but I am concerned about using a moisturizer. Won't it block my pores and prevent my topical medication from being absorbed?

Q&A: Acne as Predictor & Spreading

Q. If you have acne as a teenager, are you more likely to get rosacea as an adult?

A. While both conditions may cause pimples, no relationship has been established between teenage acne and rosacea. In fact, many rosacea patients have reported that they had always enjoyed exceptionally clear complexions prior to developing this disorder.

Q&A: Oily T-zone & Testing for Rosacea

Q. I have very large pores and am very oily in the "T" zone of my face. Is this common for rosacea sufferers?

A. There is no standard skin type for rosacea patients. Many sufferers experience dry, flaky skin, while others may have normal or oily skin. The key is to identify your skin type and use medication and skin-care products that are suitable for you.

Q&A: Long-Term Medication & Craving Triggers

Q. If I take long-term medication consistently, will it lose its effectiveness?

A. Topical therapy is commonly prescribed to control rosacea on a long-term basis, and no evidence has suggested that it loses effectiveness. A long-term controlled clinical study found that 77 percent of rosacea patients consistently using topical metronidazole remained in remission, while 42 percent of patients using no therapy had relapsed within six months.

Q&A: Visible Blood Vessels & Active Ingredients

Q. I've been using medication for some time now and it has cleared my pimples and reduced my redness, but it also seems to have made me develop more spider veins. What's going on?

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.