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Study Differentiates Rosacea from Sun Damage

A new study has documented for the first time the clinical differences between subtype 1 (erythematotelangiectatic) rosacea – characterized by facial redness and, sometimes, visible blood vessels – and a condition with visible blood vessels from sun damage known as telangiectatic photoaging (TP), providing a clear picture of the differences between the two disorders and aiding in appropriate treatment.1

Scientists Find New Pathway for Therapy

In a recent study funded by the National Rosacea Society, Dr. Yoshikazu Uchida, research dermatologist at the University of California – San Francisco, and colleagues overcame a challenge that may lead to important advances in the treatment of rosacea.

Genetic Variants May Link to Rosacea

While it has long been observed that rosacea may tend to run in families, the first genome-wide association study of rosacea may have discovered the genetic variants that are linked to this chronic skin disorder – as well as potential connections between rosacea and certain autoimmune disorders.1

Calm Yourself Down and Your Skin May Calm with You, Research Shows

It's well known that stress is a top trigger for rosacea flare-ups, but new research may point to the direct effect stress has on the skin.

Research Defines Role of Moisture Barrier in Rosacea

The facial skin of rosacea sufferers may be more susceptible to irritants due to impaired barrier function, a recent study found, resulting in the dryness experienced by many with the disorder.

New Rosacea Clues Revealed at AAD

The physical mechanisms behind flushing, the lifestyles of Demodex mites and proper skin care were among the rosacea-related topics covered at the recent 72nd annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology in Denver.

NRS Medical Advisory Board Announces Research Grants

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has awarded funding for two new studies in addition to continuing support for five ongoing studies during the year as part of its research grants program to increase knowledge and understanding of the potential causes and other key aspects of rosacea.

Researchers Report Interim Results of Studies Funded by NRS Members

A possible genetic link found in twins with rosacea and increased understanding of biochemical processes that may lead to the disorder are among the insights reported by investigators at the midpoints of their new research supported by the National Rosacea Society (NRS).

Neuropeptide May Play Role in Pain and Flushing

According to a study funded by the National Rosacea Society, researchers have found a potential connection between the nervous system and the redness and stinging of subtype 1 (erythematotelangiectatic) rosacea.

Drs. Ferda Cevikbas and Martin Steinhoff, University of California-San Francisco, noted that the flushed face of rosacea is often accompanied by stinging and burning, signs of nerve activation. They theorized this may signal a dysfunction in communication between the nerves and the vascular system.

Researchers Make Advances in Understanding of Ocular Rosacea

A new technique for improving the eye symptoms of ocular rosacea, a possible biochemical clue to its diagnosis and a potential link between Demodex and the development of corneal ulcers are among the advances from National Rosacea Society-funded researchers to appear in recent medical journals.

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Phone:
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Email:
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National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.