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research grants

National Rosacea Society Awards New Grants for Medical Research

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has awarded funding to four new studies as part of its research grants program to advance scientific knowledge of the potential causes and other key aspects of this chronic and potentially life-disruptive disorder.

Study Shows Mite-Related Bacteria May Induce Rosacea Bumps, Pimples

Although they are normal inhabitants of human skin and cannot be seen, microscopic mites known as Demodex folliculorum may actually be something to blush about, as a new study funded by the National Rosacea Society demonstrated for the first time that these invisible organisms may be a cause or exacerbating factor in rosacea.1

National Rosacea Society Awards New Grants for Rosacea Research

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has awarded funding for four new studies as part of its research grants program to advance scientific knowledge of the potential causes and other key aspects of this chronic and potentially life-disruptive disorder that affects an estimated 14 million Americans.

Research Shows Higher Prevalence

A new study funded by the National Rosacea Society provides further evidence that rosacea may be far more common than widely believed, and also assesses the potential significance of sun exposure.

The recently completed study, presented at the 2008 British Association of Dermatologists meeting by Dr. Maeve McAleer and colleagues at Mater Misericordiae University Hospital and the School of Public Health and Population Science, University College, Dublin, found that 14.4 percent of 1,000 subjects examined in Ireland had rosacea.

NRS-Funded Studies Investigate Rosacea's Inflammatory Pathways

Important new studies, funded by the National Rosacea Society (NRS) research grants program, continue to increase understanding of how specific substances in the body can produce the signs and symptoms of rosacea, leading the way toward significant advances in the treatment of this widespread and often life-disruptive disorder.

Finding Causes of Rosacea Seen as Most Important to Patients

Areas of rosacea research deemed most important by patients are the potential causes of the skin disorder, followed closely by research on eye symptoms and the progression of the condition, according to a survey conducted by the National Rosacea Society (NRS).

Scientists Trace Rosacea Triggers to Discover Sources of Symptoms

From exposure to heat to cigarette smoking, new studies are tracing the effects of rosacea triggers in the search for the cause or causes of this widespread, often life-disruptive disorder.

In interim results of a new study funded by the National Rosacea Society, Dr. Kent Keyser, professor of vision sciences, University of Alabama at Birmingham, noted that nicotine may be linked to the redness and visible blood vessels of rosacea.

Student Project Raises Visibility

Pa Vang, the daughter of Hmong immigrants from the mountains of Laos who settled in Minnesota following the Vietnam War, does not fit the stereotypical mold of a rosacea patient -- who is often fair-skinned, older and of northern European descent. But the sophomore at the University of Minnesota-Morris who was diagnosed with rosacea in her early teens is doing her part to broaden the public's perception of the disorder and whom it affects.

Study Finds Allergy-Like Reaction May Trigger Bumps and Pimples

The bumps (papules) and pimples (pustules) of rosacea, a widespread facial disorder affecting an estimated 14 million Americans, in some instances may be the result of an allergy-like reaction to environmental and emotional triggers, according to new study results presented at the National Rosacea Society (NRS) research workshop during the annual meeting of the Society for Investigative Dermatology. The seventh annual NRS workshop was attended by more than 130 medical scientists from around the world.

Breakthrough Study Wins Wide Coverage

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) funded research study on the role of cathelicidins in rosacea (see associated article) was recently published by Yamasaki et al. in Nature Medicine, one of the most prestigious medical scientific journals.1 It not only alerted the medical community to these new findings, but raised public awareness of rosacea through media coverage nationwide.

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Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
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National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.