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Changing Seasons Can Trigger Flare-Ups, New Survey Shows

While each new season brings its own delights, from spring’s blooming flowers to autumn’s falling leaves, the change in weather can also bring challenges to rosacea patients, according to a new National Rosacea Society (NRS) patient survey.  Nearly 90 percent of the 852 survey respondents said their rosacea is affected by the change in seasons, and more than 58 percent said their symptoms are at their worst during the summer.

Survey: Other Skin Conditions Often Present in Rosacea Patients

Although rosacea patients often have to cope with other skin disorders in addition to their rosacea, treatment for other conditions may tend to reduce rosacea flare-ups, according to a new survey by the National Rosacea Society.

Rosacea Patients Feel Effects of Their Condition in Social Settings

Most rosacea patients feel the negative social impact of their condition regardless of which rosacea subtype they may have, according to the results of a new National Rosacea Society survey.

Sunscreen, Other Measures Help Reduce Flare-Ups, Survey Shows

Although sun exposure may be the most common rosacea trigger, patients who take steps to protect their skin when outdoors have been successful in reducing rosacea outbreaks, according to a new National Rosacea Society patient survey. Virtually all of the 739 respondents said they make an effort to shield their skin from the sun, and 88 percent of those said their efforts had been successful or somewhat successful in reducing their rosacea flare-ups.

Survey Shows Controlling Stress Can Reduce Flare-Up Frequency

Although emotional stress is reported to be one of the most common rosacea triggers, effective stress management can lead to a reduction in the number of stress-related flare-ups, according to results of a new National Rosacea Society (NRS) survey.

Rosacea Takes Toll on Sufferers in the Workplace, Survey Shows

Unless effectively controlled, rosacea can play havoc on job interactions and employment, according to a new survey by the National Rosacea Society (NRS) on the impact in the workplace of this widespread, red-faced disorder now estimated to affect more than 16 million Americans.

Find Right Triggers to Control Rosacea

While medical therapy is an essential weapon in the battle against rosacea, identifying and avoiding the right lifestyle and environmental factors that may aggravate the disorder can be a critical tactic to include in the arsenal. In National Rosacea Society (NRS) surveys of patients who pinpointed and steered clear of their personal rosacea triggers, more than 90 percent reported that this had reduced their rosacea flare-ups.

Survey Shows Patient Compliance Critical to Controlling Symptoms

A recent patient survey by the National Rosacea Society has documented the importance of compliance with medical therapy, as 88 percent of the respondents said their symptoms reappear or increase in severity if they fail to use their medication as directed.

In the new survey, 74 percent of 658 respondents said they take their rosacea medications as prescribed by their physician. Another 17 percent said they sometimes use their medications as prescribed, and only 9 percent reported they do not follow their doctor's orders.

Heat Plays Role Even in Cold Winter Season

Heat often brings on the signs and symptoms of rosacea, and this can be a problem even in the frosty winter months, according to a recent National Rosacea Society survey of 424 rosacea patients.

Red Wine Named Top Alcohol Trigger

While some people may enjoy a drink or two as a way to lift their spirits or relax and unwind, many rosacea patients find that alcohol simply adds to their stress level by causing an outbreak of signs and symptoms.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.