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treatment

Many Specialists Provide Care

While rosacea is usually treated by a dermatologist, a new survey by the National Rosacea Society suggests that other health specialists are often the first to notice a patient might have the disorder.

In the survey of 1,584 rosacea patients, 38 percent said a non-dermatologist first noticed their condition and 26 percent were referred to a specialist. Nearly 73 percent of the latter were referred to a dermatologist, and 12 percent were referred to an eye doctor for treatment of ocular rosacea.

Psychologist Advises Managing Disease Can Break Cycle of Stress

Conspicuous disorders like rosacea can involve so many other areas of life that even a mild case can be severely distressing, said Richard G. Fried, M.D., clinical psychologist and director of Yardley Dermatology Associates, at the recent meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology. But giving patients control over their disease can break the self-destructive cycle and help keep flare-ups at bay.

Treatment Options Used to Correct Nose Enlargement

Rhinophyma, in which the enlargement of tissue results in a bulbous and bumpy appearance of the nose in some rosacea sufferers, may usually be effectively addressed with laser surgery, according to Dr. Jeffrey Dover, associate clinical professor of dermatology at Yale University.

"Although rhinophyma may be generally unresponsive to oral or topical therapy, it is usually very amenable to surgical approaches," he said. "Besides manual surgery, electrosurgery and lasers are often very effective in reducing the excess tissue and returning the nose to a more normal appearance."

Special Care, New Technology Aid Ocular Rosacea

Special care may be needed for rosacea patients with severe forms of ocular rosacea, according to Dr. Sandra Cremers, instructor of ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School. As part of a National Rosacea Society (NRS) research grant, she recently developed a scoring system to identify severe cases of this rosacea subtype, which may affect half of all rosacea patients.

ASDS Offers Safety Tips for Procedures

The American Society for Dermatologic Surgery (ASDS) has issued consumer safety tips for patients considering treatment involving lasers, light devices, chemical peels, microdermabrasion and other medical procedures, and emphasizes that such services should be performed only by a physician or under direct physician supervision.

Sensitive Skin May Require Special Care

Sensitive facial skin has been widely observed as one of the most common features of rosacea. Fortunately, however, this problem can be minimized with medical treatment, special precautions in facial care and avoidance of skin-care products that may cause irritation.

Patients Should Not Spot Treat Rosacea

At a symposium during a recent meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology, Dr. Mark V. Dahl, chairman of Dermatology, University of Minnesota, noted that to ensure the effectiveness of topical antibiotic therapy for rosacea, patients must spread the medication over the entire face.

"Some patients may apply topical therapy to individual papules and pustules, much as they may have treated acne when they were younger," said Dr. Dahl. "It is important to use this medication over the entire face as a preventive measure for it to be useful."

Q&A: Drug Resistance & Late Breaking Rosacea

Q. I am using a topical antibiotic to control my rosacea with great success. Should I suspend treatment for a couple of weeks to prevent developing a resistance to the medication?

Q&A: Laser Surgery & Topical Medication Reapplication

Q. Will laser surgery get rid of telangiectasias (spider veins or tiny visible blood vessels)?

A. Laser surgery using a pulse dye or other laser can be an effective way to treat telangiectasias on the legs. For many sufferers, laser treatment can provide long-term relief from these unwanted spider veins.

Patients Report Symptoms Reappear Unless They Follow Doctor's Orders

In a recent National Rosacea Society survey of more than 1,022 rosacea sufferers on compliance with medical therapy, 74 percent said their condition worsened if they failed to take their medication as directed by their physicians.

More than half of the respondents said a flare-up eventually occurred if they did not use medication as prescribed, and 28 percent said their symptoms became more severe. Only 4 percent said their symptoms stayed under control without proper use of medical therapy.

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National Rosacea Society
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Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.