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triggers

Q&A: Long-Term Medication & Craving Triggers

Q. If I take long-term medication consistently, will it lose its effectiveness?

A. Topical therapy is commonly prescribed to control rosacea on a long-term basis, and no evidence has suggested that it loses effectiveness. A long-term controlled clinical study found that 77 percent of rosacea patients consistently using topical metronidazole remained in remission, while 42 percent of patients using no therapy had relapsed within six months.

Q&A: Longevity of Symptoms & Computer Trigger

Q. I have had rosacea for three years now. Are there any statistics that indicate how long the condition will last?

Q&A: Anxiety & Time from Trigger to Flare-up

Q. Can being anxious or nervous contribute to a rosacea flare-up? I do a lot of public speaking and find my face sometimes gets red and swollen before an engagement.

A. Since anxiety and nervousness are forms of emotional stress, it's quite likely that the anticipation of your speaking engagement could result in a rosacea flare-up. In a National Rosacea Society survey of 602 patients, 88 percent said their rosacea often or sometimes flares up when they are under emotional stress.

Grocery List Helps Reduce Flare-Ups

Shoppers beware. Everyday items you put in your grocery cart could end up registering a rosacea flare-up. That's why reading food and skin-care product labeling before getting to the check-out line, and planning a grocery list in advance, may help sufferers learn to better manage their condition.

Q&A: Contagious? & Chlorine

Q. Is rosacea contagious?

A. No. Rosacea is not considered an infectious disease, and there is no evidence that it can be spread by contact with the skin or through inhaling airborne bacteria. The effectiveness of antibiotics against rosacea symptoms is believed to be due to their anti-inflammatory effect, rather than their ability to destroy bacteria.

Q&A: Indoor Temperature & Dry, Flaky Skin

Q. Can indoor temperature affect my rosacea?

A. It is possible that indoor temperature could affect rosacea in certain cases, since anything that causes a sufferer to flush may have the potential to lead to a flare-up. Hot weather has been documented on surveys as a rosacea trigger for 53 percent of sufferers, and being "too warm" indoors can also induce flushing.

Stress Control Reduces Flare-ups

While emotional stress is one of the most common tripwires for rosacea flare-ups, using stress reduction techniques may help reduce flare-ups for the great majority of rosacea sufferers, according to a recent survey of Rosacea Review readers.

In a survey of 602 rosacea patients, 88 percent said that their rosacea flares up when they are under emotional stress. Only 8 percent reported that stress was not a factor.

Tips on Managing Food Tripwires

Why do some foods prompt rosacea? Anything consumed that brings on flushing -- most commonly spicy foods or thermally hot beverages -- can be a culprit in inducing a flare-up. And a vast array of other foods, while less common as tripwires, has also been found to affect various individuals.

Survey Shows Skin-Care Products, Ingredients May Aggravate Rosacea

A survey recently conducted by the National Rosacea Society helps identify types of skin-care products that commonly pose problems for rosacea sufferers and which ingredients may be important to avoid.

Managing Flare-ups on Social Occasions

"Looking good" isn't just a concern of the young. Mature adults also want to make a good impression, and even those firmly established in long-term social relationships want to be at their best for social occasions.

Here are tips on how to avoid or cope with a flare-up that could imperil your social life.

  • Be prepared. In the days before special occasions, take particular care to avoid lifestyle factors that affect your individual condition. Also be sure to use all medication as prescribed in the weeks before.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.