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Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

Q&A: Four Subtypes & Antidepressants

Q. Will I eventually get all four subtypes of rosacea?

A. The four subtypes of rosacea, designated by the new standard classification system, identify common patterns of signs and symptoms. Individual patients may have all of the signs of a certain subtype, or just some of them. Others may have characteristics of more than one subtype at the same time.

While one subtype may often be seen following another, rosacea does not necessarily evolve this way in every patient. Regardless of subtype, however, each sign or symptom may become progressively severe without proper care, and appropriate treatment is therefore recommended.

Q. I am currently taking an antidepressant. Can this affect my rosacea?

A. It is difficult to generalize about the effects of medications on rosacea. However, some drugs may have the potential to exacerbate the condition in certain individuals.

If you are taking medication for depression, check the labeling carefully to see if there are any dermatological signs or symptoms listed as potential side effects. Then, notify your prescribing doctor of any concerns. There may be alternative medications or adjustments that can be made.

 

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Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.