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Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

Q&A: Topical Medication Expiration & Laser Treatment for Bumps

Q. How long is a topical medication effective? I think I have had my tube for a while, and it isn't working.

A. There is usually an expiration date on the tube label or on the prescription label affixed to the tube or packaging. However, if you feel your medication is not working, it's time to consult your doctor. Topical medications are usually prescribed for use once or twice a day -- every day -- not sporadically. In a survey of more than 1,000 rosacea patients, 74 percent said their condition worsened if they did not use medication as prescribed. Moreover, of those complying with medical therapy as prescribed, nearly 70 percent said their condition had improved.

Q. Can a laser or some other treatment be used to get rid of the white bumps I get with rosacea?

A. Oral and topical medications are used to treat the bumps and pimples of rosacea. Lasers, on the other hand, may be used for the potential vascular manifestations of rosacea -- such as to remove visible blood vessels or reduce severe redness. A CO2 laser may also be used to surgically remove excess tissue. Before arranging for laser treatment, be sure to check out the credentials, experience and qualifications of the doctor.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.