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medical therapy

Rhinophyma Treated with Options Today

While the ravages of subtype 3 (phymatous) rosacea have been well documented throughout history, today a multitude of options are available to restore a red, swollen or bumpy nose (rhinophyma) to normal appearance.

Cosmetic Choices Can Blend with Therapy

The knowledgeable use of cosmetics combined with topical medication prescribed by your dermatologist can camouflage the embarrassing redness, bumps and pimples of rosacea with a smooth appearance while medical therapy works to minimize or banish the underlying condition.

Survey Shows Patient Compliance Critical to Controlling Symptoms

A recent patient survey by the National Rosacea Society has documented the importance of compliance with medical therapy, as 88 percent of the respondents said their symptoms reappear or increase in severity if they fail to use their medication as directed.

In the new survey, 74 percent of 658 respondents said they take their rosacea medications as prescribed by their physician. Another 17 percent said they sometimes use their medications as prescribed, and only 9 percent reported they do not follow their doctor's orders.

Excess Tissue Can Be Successfully Treated with a Variety of Options

Although subtype 3 (phymatous) rosacea often involves excess tissue, it can be effectively treated with a range of options appropriate for the severity of the case, according to the standard management options for rosacea recently published by the National Rosacea Society.1

Eye Irritation Needs Special Attention

Soothing cleansing and other measures in addition to medical therapy may help relieve the symptoms of subtype 4 (ocular) rosacea, according to the standard management options for rosacea recently published by the National Rosacea Society (NRS).

"Gentle care in keeping eyelids clean is especially important in keeping eyes with ocular rosacea healthy," said Dr. Marian Macsai, professor of ophthalmology at the University of Chicago and a member of the consensus committee and review panel of 26 medical experts who developed the new standard options.1

Subtype 1 Rosacea Needs Special Care

Because the flushing and facial redness of subtype 1 (erythematotelangiectatic) rosacea are difficult to treat with medical therapy, other measures may be especially important for successfully controlling this widespread form of rosacea, according to the standard management options for rosacea recently published by the National Rosacea Society (NRS).1

Her Doctor Helps Choose Best Skin-Care Products

Theresa Pignotti jokes that she was born in a dermatologist's office and saw her dermatologist more often than her own father while growing up. Although she had impetigo as a newborn and acne as an adolescent, she was still taken aback by her first rosacea flare-up. In fact, the 54-year-old respiratory therapist from Rhode Island vividly recalls that very day in 2000.

"I thought I would treat myself to a facial for my birthday," Theresa said, "but it just made my face go crazy. I looked like I was sunburned, and I had pimples and pustules all over."

Effective Options Are Available for Treating Rosacea Inflammation

While some signs and symptoms of rosacea can be challenging to control, effective medical therapies have been extensively studied and approved for the treatment of the bumps and pimples of subtype 2 (papulopustular) rosacea, according to the standard management options for rosacea recently published by the National Rosacea Society.1

Patients More Likely to Take Oral Antibiotics If Side Effects Reduced

If potential complications and side effects of oral antibiotic therapy were minimized, the vast majority of rosacea sufferers would be more likely to accept oral therapy to treat their condition, according to results of a recent National Rosacea Society survey of 520 rosacea patients.

Patient Overcomes Five-Year Break in Medical Therapy

Andrea considered herself somewhat fortunate when she was diagnosed with rosacea about 15 years ago because her doctor worked closely with her to find just the right combination of medications and skin care products for her sensitive skin. The 46-year-old Russian translator from Maryland often stood in front of large crowds when she performed simultaneous interpretations, and she was grateful that she was able to keep her condition under control with oral and topical therapy.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.