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NRS-Funded Studies Advance Knowledge of Rosacea's Causes

Many of the factors considered potential causes of rosacea are now coming into sharp focus as a result of medical studies funded by the National Rosacea Society (NRS) research grants program, and the growing body of scientific evidence is making major strides toward defining the precise development of this widespread disorder.

New Study Links Demodex and Eye Symptoms of Ocular Rosacea

A new study has found there may be a link between ocular rosacea and bacteria associated with Demodex mites, microscopic inhabitants of normal skin that tend to occur in much greater numbers in those with rosacea.

In the recently published study of 59 rosacea patients, Dr. Jianjing Li and colleagues at the Ocular Surface Center in Miami found a significant correlation between facial rosacea, infestation of the eyes with Demodex mites and reaction to certain mite-related organisms previously shown to stimulate an immune response in rosacea sufferers.1

National Rosacea Society Awards New Grants for Medical Research

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has awarded funding to three new studies and continues to fund three ongoing studies as part of its research grants program to advance scientific knowledge of the potential causes and other key aspects of this often life-disruptive disorder.

Society Publishes New Standards for Optimal Patient Care

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has published new standard patient care options for rosacea, developed by a consensus committee and review panel of 26 rosacea experts, and articles on the various options for controlling the many potential aspects of this widespread disorder will appear in the coming issues of Rosacea Review.1

Rosacea Patients May Be Prone to Allergies

Individuals with rosacea may have a greater propensity for allergic reactions, according to a poster presented at the recent meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology.1 Dermatologist Dr. Cheryl Ackerman, in private practice in Glen Ridge, N.J., noted that many of her rosacea patients were found to have allergic reactions to ingredients found in products used on their skin, and these were identified with patch testing.

She noted that in patients with rosacea, symptoms improved after the identified substance was avoided.

 

Studies Lead Toward Potential Therapies

Results of research funded by donations from members of the National Rosacea Society (NRS) are not only increasing medical understanding of the disorder, but are now revealing potential causes that may lead scientists toward important new advances in therapy.

Rosacea Trigger Aids Medical Research

The same biochemical process that causes people to flush when alarmed or embarrassed may be linked to the development of rosacea, according to findings presented by Dr. Richard Granstein, chairman of dermatology at Cornell University, during the recent Society for Investigative Dermatology annual meeting.

Family History, Sun Linked to Rosacea

Both a blistering sunburn and a family history of rosacea were associated with the presence of rosacea, according to study results presented by Dr. Alexa Boer Kimball, associate professor of dermatology at Harvard Medical School, at the recent annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology.1

National Rosacea Society Awards New Grants for Medical Research

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has awarded funding to four new studies as part of its research grants program to advance scientific knowledge of the potential causes and other key aspects of this chronic and potentially life-disruptive disorder.

Study Shows Mite-Related Bacteria May Induce Rosacea Bumps, Pimples

Although they are normal inhabitants of human skin and cannot be seen, microscopic mites known as Demodex folliculorum may actually be something to blush about, as a new study funded by the National Rosacea Society demonstrated for the first time that these invisible organisms may be a cause or exacerbating factor in rosacea.1

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National Rosacea Society
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Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.