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Finding Causes of Rosacea Seen as Most Important to Patients

Areas of rosacea research deemed most important by patients are the potential causes of the skin disorder, followed closely by research on eye symptoms and the progression of the condition, according to a survey conducted by the National Rosacea Society (NRS).

Cinnamon Awareness

In a report of one patient, cinnamon was potentially linked to an increase in severity of the patient's rosacea, according to a report in the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology.1

Researchers Dr. Tracy Campbell and colleagues at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago reported that a woman with diabetes and mild papulopustular rosacea on the nose experienced a sudden spread of symptoms from her eyelids to her chin after using 500-mg cinnamon supplements to help control blood sugar levels.

Scientists Trace Rosacea Triggers to Discover Sources of Symptoms

From exposure to heat to cigarette smoking, new studies are tracing the effects of rosacea triggers in the search for the cause or causes of this widespread, often life-disruptive disorder.

In interim results of a new study funded by the National Rosacea Society, Dr. Kent Keyser, professor of vision sciences, University of Alabama at Birmingham, noted that nicotine may be linked to the redness and visible blood vessels of rosacea.

Student Project Raises Visibility

Pa Vang, the daughter of Hmong immigrants from the mountains of Laos who settled in Minnesota following the Vietnam War, does not fit the stereotypical mold of a rosacea patient -- who is often fair-skinned, older and of northern European descent. But the sophomore at the University of Minnesota-Morris who was diagnosed with rosacea in her early teens is doing her part to broaden the public's perception of the disorder and whom it affects.

Studies Focus on Angiogenesis' Role

Results of two recent studies provide new understanding of how and when angiogenesis -- the formation of new blood vessels -- may contribute both to the initial development of rosacea and its persistent presence. In a study of skin samples with and without rosacea, taken from biopsies and evaluated under a microscope, Dr. Amal Gomaa and colleagues at Boston University found evidence of angiogenesis in both the blood and lymphatic circulatory systems in skin with rosacea lesions.1

Study Finds Allergy-Like Reaction May Trigger Bumps and Pimples

The bumps (papules) and pimples (pustules) of rosacea, a widespread facial disorder affecting an estimated 14 million Americans, in some instances may be the result of an allergy-like reaction to environmental and emotional triggers, according to new study results presented at the National Rosacea Society (NRS) research workshop during the annual meeting of the Society for Investigative Dermatology. The seventh annual NRS workshop was attended by more than 130 medical scientists from around the world.

Special Care, New Technology Aid Ocular Rosacea

Special care may be needed for rosacea patients with severe forms of ocular rosacea, according to Dr. Sandra Cremers, instructor of ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School. As part of a National Rosacea Society (NRS) research grant, she recently developed a scoring system to identify severe cases of this rosacea subtype, which may affect half of all rosacea patients.

Breakthrough Study Wins Wide Coverage

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) funded research study on the role of cathelicidins in rosacea (see associated article) was recently published by Yamasaki et al. in Nature Medicine, one of the most prestigious medical scientific journals.1 It not only alerted the medical community to these new findings, but raised public awareness of rosacea through media coverage nationwide.

NRS-Funded Studies Shine Light on Potential New Treatment Advances

Medical scientists reported key results of ongoing research on potential causes of rosacea during the eighth annual rosacea research workshop, sponsored by the National Rosacea Society (NRS). The workshop was conducted during the annual meeting of the Society for Investigative Dermatology, and was attended by more than 100 medical researchers from around the world.

Bacteria in Mites May Cause Rosacea

In a preliminary study presented during a poster session at the American Academy of Dermatology annual meeting this year, Dr. Richard Burroughs and colleagues of Walter Reed Army Medical Center noted antibiotics may be effective in treating rosacea because of their action against yet-to-be identified bacteria.

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Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.