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social effects

Rosacea Patients Feel Effects of Their Condition in Social Settings

Most rosacea patients feel the negative social impact of their condition regardless of which rosacea subtype they may have, according to the results of a new National Rosacea Society survey.

Behavior Therapy May Help Blushing

Individuals with severe rosacea are often anxious about the social consequences of blushing and may benefit from cognitive behavioral therapy, according to a recent study published in the journal Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy.1

To evaluate the psychological and social impacts of rosacea, 31 patients completed five standard psychological questionnaires, according to researchers Dr. Daphne Su and Dr. Peter Drummond, Murdoch University, Perth, Australia.

Survey Shows Controlling Stress Can Reduce Flare-Up Frequency

Although emotional stress is reported to be one of the most common rosacea triggers, effective stress management can lead to a reduction in the number of stress-related flare-ups, according to results of a new National Rosacea Society (NRS) survey.

Rosacea Takes Toll on Sufferers in the Workplace, Survey Shows

Unless effectively controlled, rosacea can play havoc on job interactions and employment, according to a new survey by the National Rosacea Society (NRS) on the impact in the workplace of this widespread, red-faced disorder now estimated to affect more than 16 million Americans.

Rosacea Awareness Month Brings Condition into Public Spotlight

As if today's economy were not stressful enough, growing millions of Americans now face the disruption of a poorly understood condition that can wreak havoc on their emotional, social and professional lives. April was designated as Rosacea Awareness Month by the National Rosacea Society (NRS) to alert the public to the warning signs of this chronic but treatable disorder now estimated to affect well over 14 million Americans.

Tips for Handling Hurtful Comments

Facial burning and stinging are common symptoms of rosacea, but many rosacea patients also feel an emotional sting when acquaintances or even strangers make insensitive comments about their condition. Here are some tips for dealing with those awkward situations.

 

  • Don't overreact. Whether you receive a comment or find yourself the object of a lingering stare during a flare-up, try not to respond emotionally. Instead, use this as an opportunity to educate others. Many people are unaware of rosacea, and knowledge leads to understanding.

 

Rosacea Awareness Month Highlights Warning Signs of Rosacea at Any Age

The angst and embarrassment of adolescence often come roaring back in adulthood with the red-faced symptoms of rosacea, a widespread but poorly understood facial disorder now estimated to affect 14 million Americans. The National Rosacea Society (NRS) designated April as Rosacea Awareness Month to alert the public to the warning signs of this conspicuous and potentially serious condition and to emphasize the importance of seeking medical help before it becomes increasingly intrusive on daily life.

Rosacea Often Affects Patients' Social Lives, New Survey Finds

While even mild cases of rosacea can be a nuisance, this widespread disorder increasingly interferes with patients' social lives when it becomes more severe, according to a new survey by the National Rosacea Society.

In the survey of 660 rosacea patients, 86 percent of those with severe rosacea said the condition had inhibited their social lives and 67 percent of those with moderate rosacea were also affected, compared with 38 percent of mild cases.

Turn Burning Questions into Positive Education

At some point, many rosacea patients may be confronted with tactless queries or unspoken suspicions about their facial appearance. Whether it is a blunt question such as "What's wrong with your face?" or simply a puzzled stare, rosacea sufferers can handle these situations constructively without undermining their self-confidence or self-esteem by using them as opportunities to educate others about the disorder.

Survey Shows Patients Seek Help for Reasons Beyond Appearance

Rosacea is often much more than a cosmetic problem and may need to be recognized by a broader spectrum of the medical community, according to a new survey by the National Rosacea Society.

In the survey of 2,113 rosacea patients, 45 percent said they were prompted to seek diagnosis and treatment because of the emotional, social or professional consequences of their condition, while 37 percent were motivated by the physical discomfort of rosacea symptoms. Only 33 percent of the respondents were motivated by changes in appearance alone.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.