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Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

Q&A: Anxiety & Time from Trigger to Flare-up

Q. Can being anxious or nervous contribute to a rosacea flare-up? I do a lot of public speaking and find my face sometimes gets red and swollen before an engagement.

A. Since anxiety and nervousness are forms of emotional stress, it's quite likely that the anticipation of your speaking engagement could result in a rosacea flare-up. In a National Rosacea Society survey of 602 patients, 88 percent said their rosacea often or sometimes flares up when they are under emotional stress.

The good news is that for those respondents who practice stress reduction and avoidance techniques, 92 percent reported that they often or sometimes reduced those flare-ups. Try some relaxation techniques before your speech.

 

Q. How long after a rosacea trigger will a rosacea flare-up occur? For instance, if I eat a food that's a tripwire, will the flare-up happen within minutes, hours, days or weeks?

A. Although there are no data available on how quickly a rosacea trigger may lead to a flare-up, the time is likely to vary depending on the individual and the nature of the tripwire. Try monitoring your individual case to see how quickly your rosacea has responded. And remember, while a wide range of factors has been identified as potential triggers, not every tripwire affects every individual.

Submit a Question
Readers of Rosacea Review are invited to submit Questions to the "Q & A" column, to be used as space permits. Address your Questions to:

Rosacea Review
800 South Northwest Highway, Suite 200
Barrington, Illinois 60010

 

 

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Phone:
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Email:
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National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.